Don Quixote by Miguel De Cervantes

So. Finally, I have completed reading Don Quixote. I don’t remember any other novel since Les Miserables giving me this much issue to complete.

I can’t tell you who listed it because my Top Ten book remains stubbornly missing. So much so that I am about to order a new copy which is sad since my old one has all my notes and crossing outs and all of that in it.

I wasn’t very fond of Don Quixote. There were parts and themes that I was more fond of than others. Like the concept that someone could go a bit mad from all the books they read. I’m going to talk on that first.

So, Don Quixote is an old gentleman who is in love with books of knights and chivalry. He reads them with an obsession that not even my love for Stephen King rivals. He then becomes convinced he, too, is a knight. And that a peasant girl named Dulcinea is a princess whom he has sworn to.  He leaves his home on an old nag that in his head is a fine knightly steed and picks up a peasant farmer as a squire (Sancho). Then he proceeds to go and interact with the world as if it is still a chivalric code of honor world. Which it isn’t.

The idea though that books caused this fascinates me some. Because, being the huge reader I am, I know the fog that you can sometimes emerge from a book with, in which the real world seems a bit hazy, and not quite all there. It’s almost how I judge a book from bad to amazing. How much of that fog did I leave it with. Also throughout history how many acts of madness have been perpetuated based upon readings of a book (even if we remove any and all madness associated with the Bible or the Quoran)?  Even at the beginning many see the books as having caused this (in modern psychology speak) disassociative identity disorder that Quixote suffers from. The housekeeper, friend, family member and priest all get together and burn most of them in an effort to keep Quixote’s madness at bay. There are times where he seems to know even when it isn’t a time that he declares himself sane and cognizant to actually also still realize that the world isn’t as he is seeing it.

I think the other hard part of reading this was the feelings Quixote himself inspired in me. There was pity, exasperation, annoyance and a bit of respect mingled in. When people are laughing at him or when they come up with insane charades for him to “act” out his role in just so they can sit and laugh at him, then you feel such an intense pity for the man and for his squire. But, then there are when he severely hurts someone because he is in the pitch of this fantasy world of being a knight in which you want to smack him. So, I think that part of my trouble reading Quixote was these very conflicted feelings for him that I had. (A contemporary novel that gave this to me on a lesser degree was Girl on The Train, in which the narrator isn’t a very likeable woman at all).

There was and is value in having read Quixote but unless you are the type that likes very long novels and is on the quest to read as many “classics” out there as you can, this isn’t very high on my recommend list.

Advertisements

One response to “Don Quixote by Miguel De Cervantes

  1. I have to say that Kim and I are opposites on this one. I adore it, and so does the Top Ten: 5th for Sherman Alexie, 1st for Paul Auster, 1st for Russell Banks, 4th for Peter Carey, 2nd for Fred Chappell, 2nd for Clyde Edgerton, 3rd for Karen Joy Fowler, 3rd for Arthur Golden, 2nd for Wally Lamb, 1st for Tom Perrotta, and 6th for Louis D. Rubin, Jr.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s